Romeo And Juliet Act 3 Scene 5 Essay

Summary: Act 3, scene 5

Just before dawn, Romeo prepares to lower himself from Juliet’s window to begin his exile. Juliet tries to convince Romeo that the birdcalls they hear are from the nightingale, a night bird, rather than from the lark, a morning bird. Romeo cannot entertain her claims; he must leave before the morning comes or be put to death. Juliet declares that the light outside comes not from the sun, but from some meteor. Overcome by love, Romeo responds that he will stay with Juliet, and that he does not care whether the Prince’s men kill him. Faced with this turnaround, Juliet declares that the bird they heard was the lark; that it is dawn and he must flee. The Nurse enters to warn Juliet that Lady Capulet is approaching. Romeo and Juliet tearfully part. Romeo climbs out the window. Standing in the orchard below her window, Romeo promises Juliet that they will see one another again, but Juliet responds that he appears pale, as one dead in the bottom of a tomb. Romeo answers that, to him, she appears the same way, and that it is only sorrow that makes them both look pale. Romeo hurries away as Juliet pulls in the ladder and begs fate to bring him back to her quickly.

Lady Capulet calls to her daughter. Juliet wonders why her mother would come to speak to her so early in the morning. Unaware that her daughter is married to Romeo, Lady Capulet enters the room and mistakes Juliet’s tears as continued grief for Tybalt. Lady Capulet tells Juliet of her deep desire to see “the villain Romeo” dead (3.5.80). In a complicated bit of punning every bit as impressive as the sexual punning of Mercutio and Romeo, Juliet leads her mother to believe that she also wishes Romeo’s death, when in fact she is firmly stating her love for him. Lady Capulet tells Juliet about Capulet’s plan for her to marry Paris on Thursday, explaining that he wishes to make her happy. Juliet is appalled. She rejects the match, saying “I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear / It shall be Romeo—whom you know I hate— / Rather than Paris” (3.5.121–123). Capulet enters the chamber. When he learns of Juliet’s determination to defy him he becomes enraged and threatens to disown Juliet if she refuses to obey him. When Juliet entreats her mother to intercede, her mother denies her help.

After Capulet and Lady Capulet storm away, Juliet asks her nurse how she might escape her predicament. The Nurse advises her to go through with the marriage to Paris—he is a better match, she says, and Romeo is as good as dead anyhow. Though disgusted by her nurse’s disloyalty, Juliet pretends to agree, and tells her nurse that she is going to make confession at Friar Lawrence’s. Juliet hurries to the friar, vowing that she will never again trust the Nurse’s counsel. If the friar is unable to help her, Juliet comments to herself, she still has the power to take her own life.

Read a translation of Act 3, scene 5 →

Analysis

To combat the coming of the light, Juliet attempts once more to change the world through language: she claims the lark is truly a nightingale. Where in the balcony scene Romeo saw Juliet as transforming the night into day, here she is able to transform the day into the night. But just as their vows to throw off their names did not succeed in overcoming the social institutions that have plagued them, they cannot change time. As fits their characters, it is the more pragmatic Juliet who realizes that Romeo must leave; he is willing to die simply to remain by her side.

In a moment reminiscent of the balcony scene, once outside, Romeo bids farewell to Juliet as she stands at her window. Here, the lovers experience visions that blatantly foreshadow the end of the play. This is to be the last moment they spend alive in each other’s company. When Juliet next sees Romeo he will be dead, and as she looks out of her window she seems to see him dead already: “O God, I have an ill-divining soul! / Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low, / As one dead in the bottom of a tomb. / Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale” (3.5.54–57).

Flirting Lessons from Romeo & Juliet

In the confrontation with her parents after Romeo’s departure, Juliet shows her full maturity. She dominates the conversation with her mother, who cannot keep up with Juliet’s intelligence and therefore has no idea that Juliet is proclaiming her love for Romeo under the guise of saying just the opposite. Her decision to break from the counsel of her disloyal nurse—and in fact to exclude her nurse from any part in her future actions—is another step in her development. Having a nurse is a mark of childhood; by abandoning her nurse and upholding her loyalty toward her husband, Juliet steps fully out of girlhood and into womanhood.

Essay about Act 3 Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet

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Act III Scene V - This is a very important scene. Select and comment on key moments for the audience in this scene. What are some of the differences in attitudes between then and now?

Act III Scene V

This is a very important scene. Select and comment on key moments for the audience in this scene. What are some of the differences in attitudes between then and now?

Romeo and Juliet are waking up together after there first night of being man and wife. The beginning of this scene is very important because it shows the readers how much Romeo and Juliet actually love each other, they do not want to sep. Juliet begins by suggesting that they have been awakened by the nightingale and therefore it must still be night:…show more content…

This point in the scene makes the audience feel compassionate for their separation as they clearly love each other so intensely.

The next key point in this scene is after the Nurse has warned Romeo and Juliet of Lady Capulet's proximity. Romeo is about to leave out of the window and is saying his last words to Juliet. He makes a promise to her that he will not forget to keep in touch:

"I will omit no opportunity That may convey my greetings, love to thee."

When Romeo is below Juliet's window before he leaves, Juliet looks down and sees Romeo's grave with him in it. This premonition is an example of the Irony in this scene, because death and both Romeo and
Juliet come together near the end of the play. Juliet's premonition also has an effect on what the audience feel about the events that may occur after this scene. It makes the think what could come about of this premonition and why. Is Romeo going to die and if he does is it because of Juliet?

The exit of Romeo brings to another key scene in the play. This is where Lady Capulet enters and brings with her a sudden change in mood and pace of speech. The romance is gone and the mood which Lady
Capulet perceives as Juliet's grief for her cousin Tybalt is really her sadness of Romeo leaving. The audience is shown the miss-conception of Lady Capulet when Juliet plays on words and makes it seem like she wants to kill Romeo as

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